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Why not use multifilament strings?

by Tennisnerd

If you are a player who is concerned with arm problems like tennis elbow (wrist or shoulder), why not use multifilament strings?

Multifilament strings are softer for your arm and will give you more free power. Those are the benefits, the cons are that you won’t get the same durability, spin potential, and control. Still, if you are not a string breaker and you perhaps have more of a flat-hitting game style, a multifilament string could be a good choice for you.

I am not trying new multifilament strings as frequently as I try monofilament strings (polyester strings), but I believe arm comfort is very important because not playing tennis is not an option! (right?). The most recent multifilament I reviewed was the Tecnifibre Triax, which is really 50% poly and 50% multi, so it’s a stiffer and more-control oriented string than most multifilament strings.

I enjoyed Triax, because I really value control, but I was missing some spin that I enjoy from poly strings. My personal preference is therefore either to use softer polyesters or a hybrid consisting of a multifilament and a poly. Still, even heavy hitters can use multifilament strings. My regular hitting partner Mike strings his Volkl Organix MP 10 with HEAD Velocity MLT 1.30 at 56 lbs and gets decent control and lifespan out of it.

How detailed are you with your string choice?

My tennis friend Ingemar in Sweden send me the below spreadsheet detailing his play-test of 10 different multifilament strings in March-May 2020. I like how detailed it is and I think he can feel confident now that he has done his homework and chosen a string. I am not completely surprised that found Tecnifibre X-One Bi-Phase to be his favorite string. That is one of the best multifilaments out there in my opinion.

From the table, it is obvious that he was looking for power and comfort. Since I personally value control more, my choice of string would probably be different, so you need to know what you are looking for in your string.

What are you looking for in your string setup? Power? Control? Comfort? Are you using poly or multifilament strings? 

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6 comments

Patrick McCall October 19, 2020 - 6:32 pm

Thanks for posting this info Jonas !!!

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Tennisnerd October 20, 2020 - 6:27 am

I aim to please 🙂

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Stanislav October 19, 2020 - 6:35 pm

TF Duramix HD, Ashaway Dynamite Tough, and monofilament Ashaway Monogut ZX for main is very good choise. Solinco X-Natural is one of the best for first hour of play, but It’s brake too fast. But it’s all exotics, and my basic string for last year was Babolat XCel RG limited, and right now I hate it. String little bit muted and after you crack PU coating, you need run to stringer.
X-one is realy best multy, but overpriced.
Sensation Plus – best durability, quality and price mix.
And don’t forget that best multy is natural gut )))

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Tennisnerd October 20, 2020 - 6:27 am

Some good tips there!

Reply
Tennis Lion October 20, 2020 - 3:26 pm

Many demo rackets I have recently tried were strung with a combo of various polys in the mains, and Sensation 15 in the crosses. The latter is a thick 138 multi, which I believe the shop uses for durability. Combined with AluPower, RPM Blast or Yonex PT-spin, the Sensation works great to support the chosen poly. Moreover, I can also recommend Sensation 16 in the mains with Revolve poly in the crosses (a combination sold as Wilson Spin Hybrid), for a soft but extremely lively and spinny setup.

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Adrian R Clinton October 21, 2020 - 2:34 am

You mention your friend has Roanic actual racquet. Does it have lead in the head and handle or just the head. Thanks for your response to this question and thank you for keeping up with the current racquets and string demo.

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