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Heysil Racquets Review

by Tennisnerd

I have already written about the brand in my “introduction” post, but here is my Heysil Racquets Review video.

If you want to read more about Heysil racquets, you should check out my post dealing with the brand, the specs of their racquets and a podcast with founder Jeffrey Yeh. This post is mainly a vehicle for my Heysil racquets review video.

To summarize what I say in the video. I tested two racquets: Heysil Tour 98 and Heysil Tour 100 with similar strung specs (305g unstrung, 323 SW, and 32.5 cm balance. Both racquets were strung with Heysil Tour Blue string in 1.25 gauge around 53-55 lbs or 24-25 kg.

Both racquets are blacked out and contain nothing except for high-modulus graphite and lead to achieve the right balance. They are made in Taiwan for better quality control assurance (according to Heysil). One benefit is that Heysil gives a quality control assurance of +-1 gram and +-1 mm balance.  This is one benefit of choosing a smaller brand like Angell, Dahcor or Heysil – you get a more hands-on approach and better quality control than most large-scale companies.

Heysil Racquets Review – How do they play?

I really enjoyed this play-test. The feeling was raw and direct, meaning you get a lot of feedback from these frames. You know where in the string bed you hit the ball. They are comfortable thanks to the low stiffness, but if you prefer a muted or dampened feel, these frames are not for you.

They don’t pack a lot of power but are more controlled than most of the frames in this category. The Tour 98 plays close to a kBlade 98 from a while back and the Tour 100 is more like a HEAD Gravity MP or a bit firmer Phantom 100X 305. The sweet spot and spin potential are bigger on the 100, while the tight 18×20 on the 98 are better for control.

I felt very connected to the ball on the 98. It packs a medium level of power, which works well for my game. The control is great and the feel on contact is not Prestige-plush, but nice.

The Tour 100 was easier to use and is more suited for the baseline player who wants some free power and spin, but without going all the way to the thicker beam of Pure Drives or Ultras.

All-in-all, I’m very pleased with these frames and will give the Tour 98 the ultimate test by taking it into my next tournament match.

Find out more about Heysil on Heysil.com

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2 comments

Dariusz September 29, 2020 - 7:31 am

It is possible for you to compare me Heysil Tour 100 with the new Head Speed ??MP and the new Yonex Ezone 100. Balance, SW and maneuverability?

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Anthony September 30, 2020 - 9:37 am

Always great seeing Aussies showcasing their talents on a global scale and taking on the big boys in their own way. The 98 looks like something I’d enjoy playing with given my racquet is the TF40.

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