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Top 5 Racquets for Advanced Players

by Tennisnerd

In the previous post, I recommended some racquets for intermediate players. This post deals with the Top 5 racquets for advanced players.

There are a lot of really nice player frames out there these days, so making a list of only a few items is somewhat tricky. But I know people might not like too much choice. So without further ado, here are my top 5 racquets for advanced players.

What is an advanced player? I would say anyone on or above the 5.0 NTRP scale would qualify as an advanced player.

Wilson Blade 98 V7 16×19

Wilson Blade 98 V7 Racquet Review

One of my favorite racquets of last year is the Wilson Blade 98 V7 16×19. I always enjoyed the Blade line of racquets, but I wasn’t a fan of the muted feel of the Countervail version. The new Blade was plusher, more comfortable, and offered a better feel. Yes, if you like stiffer racquets, I would still recommend the 2013 or 2015 BLX versions, but if you want a bit of flex – the Blade 98 does the trick!

Watch or read my Wilson Blade 98 V7 Racquet Review
You can buy the Wilson Blade 98 V7 from my buddy at All Things Tennis and get a 5% discount and a free stringing. Just use the code TENNISNERD at checkout!

String suggestion: Luxilon Alu Power at 22 kg or 49 lbs.

Tecnifibre TF 40 305

Tecnifibre TF40

A racquet that caught me by surprise was the Tecnifibre TF40. It is slightly stiffer and more powerful than the Blade 98 but still offers a nice “cupping” feel in the string bed. It is also quite spin-friendly for an 18×20 racquet. And I think it looks brilliant in white, red and blue.

Watch or read my Tecnifibre TF40 305 Racquet Review

You can buy the Tecnifibre TF40 from my buddy at All Things Tennis and get a 5% discount and a free stringing. Just use the code TENNISNERD at checkout!

String suggestion: Tecnifibre Ice Code at 23 kg or 51 lbs.

HEAD Graphene 360+ Prestige MP

The Prestige is one of the most iconic lines in racquet history. But it got lost a bit when HEAD introduced Graphene into their frames and made them stiffer. With the Graphene 360+ technology, the flex came back and so also the beautiful, flexible feel of the Prestige as we know it. This frame does not give you a lot of free power, but it gives you excellent feel, comfort, and connection to the ball.

Watch or read my HEAD Prestige racquet review

You can buy the HEAD Graphene 360+ Prestige MP from my buddy at All Things Tennis and get a 5% discount and a free stringing. Just use the code TENNISNERD at checkout!

String suggestion: HEAD Lynx Tour at 22 kg or 49 lbs.

Yonex VCORE Pro 97 HD

Yonex VCORE Pro 97 HD

This model is new to the Yonex VCORE Pro 97 series and what an addition it was!  The Yonex VCORE Pro 97 HD is simply a great racquet for advanced players with a low stiffness rating, good stability, and buckets of control. It is my favorite of the entires series and a must-demo for advanced players.

Watch or read my Yonex VCORE Pro 97 HD Racquet Review

String suggestion: Hybrid setup with natural gut or a multifilament or syn gut in the mains at 25 kg / 55 lbs (Prince Premier Touch and HEAD Velocity are two favorites) and a round poly in the crosses like Luxilon Alu Power or RS Lyon at 24 kg or 53 lbs.

Dunlop CX 200 Tour 18×20

Dunlop Srixon CX 200 Tour Racquet Review

If you want great control and feel, the Dunlop CX 200 Tour series is as good as it gets. 95 sq inch head size racquets are increasingly rare in the market these days, but this one delivers a slightly bigger sweet spot than most of them. You get pinpoint precision and a fast-feeling frame with the CX 200 Tour. I like both string patterns, but probably end up preferring the ultimate control of the 18×20 pattern.

Read and watch my review of the Dunlop CX 200 Tour here

You can buy the Dunlop CX 200 Tour from my buddy at All Things Tennis and get a 5% discount and a free stringing. Just use the code TENNISNERD at checkout!

String suggestion: Luxilon Alu Power 1.15 at 23 kg or 51 lbs.

Summary

There are plenty of really nice advanced player racquets out there. A few that I don’t mention here, but really, really enjoy are Prince Phantom 93P 18×20, the Dahcor 97KS, the Angell TC 97 Custom 18×20, and a few others that I probably forget. I know that there is a jungle out there of racquets for all levels and types of players. So if you don’t know what to get, please consider using the Tennisnerd racquet consultation service. It currently has 15 five-star reviews and counting and I love helping players find the right racquet.

What is your favorite advanced player racquet? 

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3 comments

Bob April 29, 2020 - 4:45 pm

Great racquet choices, Jonas! If you were to pick between the Yonex and a weighted up Dunlop (since that racquet needs some modification to shine), which would you go with and why?

Reply
John May 2, 2020 - 6:36 pm

Jonas..great reviews on these 5 advanced tennis racquets..but it seems none of these are XL models, that is longer than a standard 27 inch frame,,.And we know now many pros are playing with racquets longer than 27..A very easy way now of taking a standard 27 and turning it in an XL 27.5 is to install the XTP Xtended Tennis Product butt cap, just remove the factory butt cap on any racquet and customize it half an inch longer..thx..john

Reply
pedro May 3, 2020 - 2:18 am

Could you suggest some more open pattern (16/19 or 16/20 etc) racquets for advanced players? I mean, just because you are a good player, it doesn’t mean you don’t aim to use the topspin of fed or nadal, who use open patterns. I tend to find it a bit annoying that so many racquets for advanced players come out with only dense patterns – like releasing the PT280 in 18/20 not the 16/19 that murray uses.

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